IBM Food Trust Tracks the Food Down to the Farm

Steve Anderrson
Steve Anderson is an Australian crypto enthusiast. He is a specialist in management and trading for over 5 years. Steve has worked as a crypto trader, he loves learning about decentralisation, understanding the true potential of the blockchain. Join the official channel of thecoinrepublic, For the latest news updates: https://t.me/thecoinrepublic

IBM Food Trust Tracks the Food Down to the Farm

  • One of the most innovative and practical uses of blockchain technology is seen by the IBM Food Trust.
  • The QR code on the packaging tells consumers about the entire life history of eggs helping them make informed choices.
  • This data revolution stimulated by blockchain technology will go a long way in creating eco-conscious and informed consumers.

One of the most innovative and practical uses of blockchain technology is seen by the IBM Food Trust, which is currently allowing consumers to track food from the farm to the warehouse to the kitchen. This Christmas, the menu on the holiday table is in essence, a feast of data from food growers, producers and retailers across the globe.

More than 200 companies are members of the Food Trust, which connects participants across the food chain in the permanent and shared record of data. 

Here are some classic holiday feast foods that are backed by blockchain: Devilled eggs are an authentic platter, but with the IBM food tracker, one will also know answers to their questions about hen welfare almost instantly. More than 200 million organic eggs from 2 million hens are now traceable thanks to the implementation of blockchain by the Coop Italia grocery chain.


The QR code on the packaging tells consumers about the entire life history of eggs helping them make informed choices.
European grocery chain Carrefour is next to where IBM Food Trust is tracking chicken, eggs, milk, oranges and cheese. The same QR code technology used to learn about the livestock’s date of birth, nutrition information and packing date.


The blockchain-tracked chicken sales now exceed that of the non-blockchain poultry in the chain.
IBM is currently working on an agri-business start-up to build a coffee-tracking app that provides detailed data about the history of the beverage, including its place of origin. 

The Sustainable Shrimp Partnership is using blockchain to trace the journey of Ecuadorian farmed shrimp to ensure that seafood is correctly labelled and sustainably caught. Raw Seafood in Massachusetts is tracking scallops, Cermaq and Labeyrie are tracking salmon farming and producing respectively to allow consumers to learn about seafood’s quality and origin.


Even the National Fisheries Institute is part of the network.
Green salad and Lettuce tracked by the Food Trust from farms to Grocery shelves. This will help in locating contaminated products immediately in case of a foodborne illness outbreak and increase consumer confidence.

 

Switzerland-based food giant Nestlé, French supermarket chain Carrefour and IBM Food Trust are partnering to use blockchain technology to track each packet of Mousseline’s instant mashed potato. By scanning a barcode, consumers receive information on the mix, including its origin and variety. 

 

Italian food maker Gruppo Grigi is using Food Trust to certify that its Aliveris pasta is made from organic Italian wheat and non-GMO products and view a range of other product details. Chilean company Agri com joined the Food trust to trace its fruits like apples, oranges and lemons to increase transparency and motivate reduction of wastage.

 

This data revolution stimulated by blockchain technology will go a long way in creating eco-conscious and informed consumers, along with highlighting the significance of sustainable food production. It further expected to improve food safety, minimize waste and increase transparency.

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